Almost One Million Irish Slaves At Risk Of Being Scrubbed From History

August 3, 2016 by Baxter Dmitry in News, World

 

I found this article written by Baxter Dmitry.  It spells out the real history of Irish slavery that for some reason everyone wants to forget or pretend it wasn’t that bad.  Please read and educate your children about how cruel the Lords and Masters have been and how it has nothing to do with skin color and everything to do with power.

 

The history of the Irish slaves has long been suppressed, and a modern movement of Irish slavery denial has even gained mainstream acceptance.

They came in the holds of overcrowded ships, packed in among cargo and animals, and those who survived the journey were bought and sold in chains to work as hard their owners chose. They were taken to the Carribean, to the American colonies, and beyond.  Sound familiar? But these forced immigrants, deprived of all personal freedom, were Irish slaves, and their servitude started long before black slavery was common.

The history of the Irish slaves has long been suppressed, and a modern movement of Irish slavery denial has even gained mainstream acceptance. Promoters of this toxic ideology claim that it is ‘racist’ to say the Irish were ever sold as slaves, as this ‘takes away’ from the black experience.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Slavery is slavery. Any person who is bought and sold, chained and abused, whether for a decade or a lifetime, deserves to be remembered, their tragic legacy respected.

The Irish were sold into slavery in their hundreds of thousands – it is a historical fact, backed by undeniable evidence.  Whether it is politically correct or not, whether it is taught in schools or scrubbed from textbooks, it remains a fact and we must guard against it being forgotten.

Mr G o illa

Most people have heard of the Great Famine, or Potato Famine, which decimated the population of Ireland by around 25%. That pales in comparison to the disaster that England inflicted upon Ireland between 1641 and 1652, when the population of Ireland fell from 1,466,000 to 616,000 – a staggering reduction.

As hard as it is to believe, things only got worse from there.

Daily Kos reports:

From the Tudor reconquest of Ireland until Irish Independence in 1921, the English puzzled over the problem of what to do with all those Irish people.

They were the wrong religion. They spoke the wrong language. But the big problem was that there were just too many of them.

The English had been practicing a slow genocide against the Irish since Queen Elizabeth, but the Irish bred too fast and were tough to kill. On the other side of the Atlantic, there was a chronic labor shortage (because the local natives tended to die out too quickly in slavery conditions).

Putting two and two together, King James I started sending Irish slaves to the new world.

The first recorded sale of Irish slaves was to a settlement in the Amazon in 1612, seven years before the first African slaves arrived in Jamestown.

The Proclamation of 1625 by James II made it official policy that all Irish political prisoners be transported to the West Indies and sold to English planters. Soon Irish slaves were the majority of slaves in the English colonies.

christian slaves

 

In 1629 a large group of Irish men and women were sent to Guiana, and by 1632, Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat in the West Indies. By 1637 a census showed that 69% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves, which records show was a cause of concern to the English planters. But there were not enough political prisoners to supply the demand, so every petty infraction carried a sentence of transporting, and slaver gangs combed the country sides to kidnap enough people to fill out their quotas.

The slavers were so full of zest that they sometimes grabbed non-Irishmen. On March 25, 1659, a petition was received in London claiming that 72 Englishmen were wrongly sold as slaves in Barbados, along with 200 Frenchmen and 7-8,000 Scots.

So many Irish slaves were sent to Barbados, between 12,000 and 60,000, that the term “barbadosed” began to be used. By the 1630’s, Ireland was the primary source of the English slave trade.

And then disaster struck.

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