Massive Identity Theft from Experian Consumers Credit Warning

I just found this at Kim Komando’s site, and if you have ever used Experian or they have your information, then you may be vulnerable to Identity theft!  Here is the article:

200 million American IDs compromised in massive credit bureau scam

A massive breach of security has landed one of America’s big three credit bureaus – and hundreds of millions of consumers – in hot water. KrebsOnSecurity reports that a stolen identity marketplace run by a Hieu Minh Ngo, a Vietnamese scammer, hijacked and distributed as many as 30 million IDs, and he had access to many millions more. The credit bureau under scrutiny: Experian.

Brian Krebs reports:

Posing as a private investigator operating out of Singapore, Ngo contracted with Court Ventures, paying for his access to consumer records via regular cash wire transfers from a bank in Singapore. Through that contract, Ngo was able to make available to his clients access to the US Info Search database containing Social Security, date of birth and other records on more than 200 million Americans.

Experian came into the picture in March 2012, when it purchased Court Ventures (along with all of its customers — including Mr. Ngo). For almost ten months after Experian completed that acquisition, Ngo continued siphoning consumer data and making his wire transfers.

Krebs was the investigator who first uncovered evidence of the brutal retail security breach that eviscerated Target, Neiman Marcus and others. As these types of data leaks become more common, your identity will need an agressive defense more than ever. Click here to learn what you need to do right now to protect yourself from ID theft.

If you are not subscribed to Kim Komando’s site, I highly recommend it.

Krebs site had this to say, and it appears this happened a bit ago,  but it’s becoming a huge story:


Mar 14

Experian Lapse Allowed ID Theft Service Access to 200 Million Consumer Records

In October 2013, KrebsOnSecurity published an exclusive story detailing how a Vietnamese man running an online identity theft service bought personal and financial records on Americans directly from a company owned by Experian, one of the three major U.S. credit bureaus. Today’s story looks deeper at the damage wrought in this colossal misstep by one of the nation’s largest data brokers.

Vietnamese national Hieu Minh Ngo pleaded guilty last week to running the ID theft service Superget.info.

Vietnamese national Hieu Minh Ngo pleaded guilty last week to running the ID theft service Superget.info.

Last week, Hieu Minh Ngo, a 24-year-old Vietnamese national, pleaded guilty to running an identity theft service out of his home in Vietnam. Ngo was arrested last year in Guam by U.S. Secret Service agents after he was lured into visiting the U.S. territory to consummate a business deal with a man he believed could deliver huge volumes of consumers’ personal and financial data for resale.

But according to prosecutors, Ngo had already struck deals with one of the world’s biggest data brokers: Experian. Court records just released last week show that Ngo tricked an Experian subsidiary into giving him direct access to personal and financial data on more than 200 million Americans. 

HIEU KNOWS YOUR SECRETS?

As I reported last year, the data was not obtained directly from Experian, but rather via Columbus, Ohio-based US Info Search. US Info Search had a contractual agreement with a California company named Court Ventures, whereby customers of Court Ventures had access to the US Info Search data as well as Court Ventures’ data, and vice versa.

Posing as a private investigator operating out of Singapore, Ngo contracted with Court Ventures, paying for his access to consumer records via regular cash wire transfers from a bank in Singapore. Through that contract, Ngo was able to make available to his clients access to the US Info Search database containing Social Security, date of birth and other records on more than 200 million Americans.  MORE

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